Tun

Definition from zikkir, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

English

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʌn

Noun

Tun (plural Tuns)
  1. A large cask; an oblong vessel bulging in the middle, like a pipe or puncheon, and girt with hoops; a wine cask.
  2. (brewing) A fermenting vat.
  3. An English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 252 wine gallons; equal to two pipes.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, p. 205:
      Again, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it is re-enacted that the tun of wine should contain 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31.5 gallons, a rundlet 18.5 gallons.
  4. A weight of 2,240 pounds.
  5. An indefinite large quantity.
  6. A drunkard; so called humorously, or in contempt.
  7. (zoology) Any shell belonging to Dolium and allied genera; called also tun-shell.

Anagrams


Anglo-Norman

Pronoun

Tun m. (feminine ta)

  1. your (second-person singular possessive pronoun)

Synonyms


Danish

Etymology 1

A contraction of tunfisk, from German Thunfisch (tuna), from Latin thunnus, from Ancient Greek θύννος (thýnnos).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

Noun

Tun c. (singular definite Tunen, plural indefinite Tun)

  1. tuna
  2. tuna fish
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse tún.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

Noun

Tun n. (singular definite Tunet, plural indefinite Tun)

  1. (dated) an enclosed piece of ground
Inflection

Etymology 3

See tune.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /tuːn/, [tˢuːˀn]

Verb

Tun

  1. imperative of tune

German

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [tʰuːn]

Etymology

From the Middle High German tuon, from the Old High German tuon, akin to the Old Saxon dôn; compare the Dutch doen.

Verb

Tun (irregular, third-person singular simple present tut, past tense tat, auxiliary haben, past participle getan)

  1. to do
  2. to make

Conjugation

Derived terms


Inari Sami

Pronoun

Tun

  1. (personal) you (sg.)

Mandarin

Pinyin

Tun (form of tun0 or tun5)

  1. : hunger, starving; hungry; a famine
  2. simplified: , traditional: : eat, food; radical number 184

Pinyin syllable

tun

  1. A transliteration of any of a number of Chinese characters properly represented as having one of four tones, tūn, tún, tǔn, or tùn.

Notes

English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.


Mapudungun

Verb

Tun (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. to catch

Conjugation



Old English

Etymology

From Germanic *tūna- ‘enclosure’. Cognate with Old Frisian tūn, Old Saxon tūn (Dutch tuin (garden)), Old High German zūn (German Zaun (fence)), Old Norse tún (Swedish tun (fence)).

Pronunciation

Noun

tūn m.

  1. An enclosed piece of ground, an enclosure or garden.
  2. The enclosed ground belonging to an individual dwelling.
  3. The group of houses on an area of enclosed land, a homestead.
  4. A large inhabited place, a town.

Descendants

Related terms

See also

  • dōn "to place, put, set"

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin tonus.

Noun

Tun n. (plural tunuri)

  1. cannon
  2. (archaic, popular) thunderclap

Related terms


Romansch

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin tonus.

Noun

Tun m.

  1. sound
  2. thunder

Skolt Sami

Pronoun

Tun

  1. (personal) you (sg.)

be:tun br:tun cs:tun de:tun et:tun el:tun es:tun eo:tun fr:tun ko:tun hr:tun io:tun id:tun it:tun rw:tun ku:tun lo:tun lt:tun hu:tun my:tun ja:tun nds:tun pl:tun pt:tun ru:tun fi:tun sv:tun te:tun tr:tun vi:tun vo:tun zh:tun

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox