Try

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English

Verb

Try (third-person singular simple present tries, present participle Trying, simple past and past participle tried)

  1. To attempt. Followed by infinitive.
    I tried to rollerblade, but I couldn’t.
    I'll come to dinner soon. I'm trying to beat this level first.
  2. (obsolete) To separate (precious metal etc.) from the ore by melting; to purify, refine.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii:
      euery feend his busie paines applide, / To melt the golden metall, ready to be tride.
  3. To make an experiment. Usually followed by a present participle.
    I tried mixing more white paint to get a lighter shade.
  4. To work on something.
    You are trying too hard.
  5. To put to test.
    I shall try my skills on this
  6. To taste, sample, etc.
    Try this—you’ll love it.
  7. To put on trial.
    He was tried and executed.
  8. To tire.
    You are trying my patience.
  9. (nautical) To lie to in heavy weather under just sufficient sail to head into the wind.

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Noun

Try (plural tries)
  1. An attempt.
    I gave unicycling a try but I couldn’t do it.
  2. An act of tasting or sampling.
    I gave sushi a try but I didn’t like it.
  3. (rugby) A score in rugby, analogous to a touchdown in American football.
    Today I scored my first try.

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Derived terms

Adverbs for Try

exceedingly; sorely; insistently; surreptitiously; deliberately; variously; perfunctorily; conscientiously; piteously; energetically; manfully; sorely; convulsively; obstinately; blunderingly; elaborately; abominably; faithfully; vainly; nervously; falteringly; guiltily; strenuously.

Thesaurus

acid test, agonize, aim, annoy, appraise, approach, arbitrate, aspire, assay, attempt, bear hard upon, bid, bid for, blank determination, bolt, bother, bring to test, brouillon, burden, chance, charge the jury, check, clarify, clear, conduct a trial, confirm, contend for, crack, criterion, crucial test, crucible, crucify, cut and try, dab, decrassify, demonstrate, depurate, determination, distill, distress, docimasy, edulcorate, effort, elute, endeavor, engage, essay, essentialize, examine, excruciate, experiment, extract, feeling out, filter, filtrate, first draft, fling, gambit, give a try, give a tryout, go, go hard with, go ill with, harass, harrow, hassle, have a go, hear, hold court, hold the scales, hope, inspect, irk, jab, judge, kiteflying, leach, lick, lie on, lift a finger, lixiviate, load, make an attempt, make an effort, martyr, move, offer, officiate, oppress, ordeal, overburden, overload, pain, percolate, play around with, pop, practice upon, probation, proof, prove, pull for, purify, put to trial, rack, rectify, referee, refine, research, road-test, rough draft, rough sketch, run a sample, sample, screen, scrutinize, seek, separate, shake down, shot, sieve, sift, sit in judgment, slap, sounding out, spiritualize, stab, stagger, standard, step, strain, strain for, stress, strike, strive, strive for, striving, stroke, strong bid, struggle, struggle for, sublimate, sublime, substantiate, taste, tentative, test, test case, torment, torture, touchstone, trial, trial and error, trouble, try a case, try for, try it on, try one, try out, umpire, undertake, undertaking, validate, venture, venture on, venture upon, verification, verify, vex, weigh, weigh down, weigh heavy on, weigh on, weigh upon, whack, whirl, winnow, wring

Etymology

From Middle English trien (to try a legal case), from Anglo-Norman trier (to try a case), Old French trier (to choose, pick out or separate from others, sift, cull), of uncertain origin. Believed to be a metathetic variation of Old French tirer (to pull out, snatch), of Germanic origin, from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (tiran, to tear away, remove), from Proto-Germanic *tiranan, *tirōnan (to tear, tear apart), from Proto-Indo-European *derə- (to tear, tear apart), see tear. Related to Occitan triar (to pick out, choose from among others).

Replaced native Middle English cunnen (to try) (from Old English cunnian), Middle English fandien (to try, prove) (from Old English fandian), and Middle English costnien (to try, tempt, test) (from Old English costnian).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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Noun

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