Toll

From zikkir
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Noun

Toll (plural Tolls)
  1. Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.
    The war has taken its toll on the people.
  2. A fee for using a transportation facility such a road, bridge, or ferry.
  3. (business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.
    We can handle on a toll basis your needs for spray drying, repackaging, crushing and grinding, and dry blending.
  4. (US) A tollbooth.
    We will be replacing some manned tolls with high-speed device readers.

Derived terms

Verb

Toll (third-person singular simple present Tolls, present participle Tolling, simple past and past participle Tolled)

  1. (transitive) To impose a fee for the use of.
    Once more it is proposed to toll the East River bridges.
  2. (transitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).
  3. (transitive) To take as a toll.

Noun

Toll (plural Tolls)
  1. The act or sound of tolling

Verb

Toll (third-person singular simple present Tolls, present participle Tolling, simple past and past participle Tolled)

  1. To summon by ringing a bell.
    The ringer tolled the workers back from the fields for vespers.
  2. To make the noise of a bell
    For whom the bell tolls.
    • 1922, James Joyce , Ulysses Episode 12, The Cyclops
      From the belfries far and near the funereal deathbell tolled unceasingly while all around the gloomy precincts rolled the ominous warning of a hundred muffled drums punctuated by the hollow booming of pieces of ordnance.
  3. To ring a bell slowly and repeatedly
  4. To announce by tolling
    The bells tolled the King’s death.

Derived terms

Verb

Toll (third-person singular simple present Tolls, present participle Tolling, simple past and past participle Tolled)

  1. To entice
  2. To lure with bait (especially, fish and animals).

Synonyms

Verb

Toll (third-person singular simple present Tolls, present participle Tolling, simple past and past participle Tolled)

  1. (law, obsolete) To take away; to vacate; to annul.
  2. (law) To suspend.
    The statute of limitations defense was tolled as a result of the defendant’s wrongful conduct.

Adjectives for Toll

devilish; patient; terrible; enormous; death; preposterous.

Verbs for Toll

assess—; augment—; bear—; charge—; deflate—; demand—; enforce—; exact—; fix —; levy—; quote—; rate—; set—; take—; subject to—; —burdens; —enables; —-mounts; —taxes; —yields,

Adverbs for Toll

solemnly; mournfully; dismally; repetitiously; funereally; fatally; heavily; vibrantly.

Thesaurus

admission, admission fee, allure, anchorage, assessment, bait, bell, bong, brokerage, carfare, cellarage, cess, change ringing, charge, charges, chime, chiming, chink, clang, clanging, clangor, clank, clanking, clink, conscience money, contribution, cost, cover charge, damages, decoy, demand, ding, ding-a-ling, dingdong, dinging, dingle, direct tax, dockage, dong, donging, dues, duty, entice, entrance fee, entrap, exaction, exactment, excise, fare, fee, gong, graduated taxation, hire, imposition, impost, indirect tax, inveigle, jangle, jingle, jingle-jangle, jinglejangle, jingling, joint return, knell, knelling, lead on, levy, license fee, loss, peal, peal ringing, pealing, penalty, pilotage, portage, price, progressive tax, ring, ring changes, ringing, salvage, scot, scot and lot, seduce, separate returns, shot, single tax, sound, sound a knell, sounding, storage, strike, striking, supertax, surtax, tariff, tax, tax base, tax dodging, tax evasion, tax exemption, tax return, tax structure, tax withholding, tax-exempt status, taxable income, taxation, tempt, ting, ting-a-ling, tingle, tingling, tink, tinkle, tinkling, tinnitus, tintinnabulate, tithe, tolling, towage, tribute, wharfage, withholding tax

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /təʊl/, /tɒl/
  • (US) IPA: /toʊl/, /tɒl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl

Etymology 1

From Middle English tol, tolle, from Old English tol, toll, toln (toll, duty, custom), from Proto-Germanic *tullō (what is counted or told), from Proto-Indo-European *dol- (calculation, fraud)[1]. Cognate with Dutch tol (toll), German Zoll (toll, duty, customs), Danish told (toll, duty, tariff), Swedish tull (toll, customs), Icelandic tollur (toll), Latin dolus (trick, deception). More at tell, tale.

Alternate etymology derives Old English toll from Vulgar Latin *tolōneum, alteration of Latin telōneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (toll-house) from τέλος (telos, tax).

Etymology 2

Probably the same as Etymology 3. Possibly related to or influenced by toil

Etymology 3

From Old English tollian, related to fortyllan (to seduce).

Alternative forms

Etymology 4

From Latin tollere

Translations

Noun

The translations below need to be checked.

References

  1. Whitney, The Century dictionary and cyclopedia, toll.

Verb

Noun

Verb

Verb

Verb


Catalan

Noun

Toll m. (plural Tolls)

  1. pool, puddle

German

Adjective

toll

  1. crazy
  2. great

Etymology

Old High German tol

Pronunciation

Declension

See also


Hungarian

Noun

Toll (plural Tollak)

  1. feather
  2. pen

Etymology

From Proto-Uralic *tulka (feather, wing).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈtolː/

Declension

Derived terms


Irish

Verb

Toll (present tollann, past tholl, future tollfaidh, conditional thollfadh, past participle tollta, verbal noun tolladh)

  1. to bore, pierce, perforate

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [t̪ˠoːl̪ˠ], [t̪ˠɔl̪ˠ]

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
toll tholl dtoll
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old English

Noun

Toll n.

  1. tax, toll, fare

Etymology

Borrowed into Germanic (*tolla-) from vulgar Latin toloneum, from late Latin teloneum, from Greek τελώνιον ‘toll-house’, from τέλος ‘tax’. Germanic cognates include Old Saxon tol (Dutch tol), Old High German zol (German Zoll), Old Norse tollr (Swedish tull). See also parallel forms represented by Old English toln.

Pronunciation


Scottish Gaelic

Noun

  1. hole, cavity, puncture, hollow
  2. crevice, perforation
  3. pit
  4. socket
  5. hold of a ship
  6. (vulgar) arse

Derived terms

Verb

Toll (verbal noun tolladh)

  1. bore, piece, drill, perforate

Skolt Sami

Noun

Toll

  1. fire