Mute

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English

Adjective

Mute (comparative muter, superlative mutest)

  1. Silent; not making a sound.
    • 1956, Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins (?, translators), Lion Feuchtwanger (German author), Raquel: The Jewess of Toledo (translation of Die Jüdin von Toledo),[1] Messner, page 178:
      [] The heathens have broken into Thy Temple, and Thou art silent! Esau mocks Thy Children, and Thou remainest mute! Show thyself, arise, and let Thy Voice resound, Thou mutest among all the mute!”
  2. (of a person) Not having the power of speech.

Noun

Mute (plural Mutes)
  1. A person who does not have the power of speech.
  2. An acting part where no speaking (and in opera, no singing) is required.
  3. (music) An object for dulling the sound of an instrument, especially a brass instrument, or damper for pianoforte; a sordine.
  4. One refusing to speak.
  5. An undertaker's assistant.
  6. The deadening of an appliance's or musical instrument's volume.
  7. In falconry, a mute is a hawk's or falcon's droppings, particularly more solid ones which fall down. (See slice.)
  8. In wine making, mute, from the French, is the grape juice from pressed grapes kept aside in chilled stainless steel tanks and used at later stages of wine making by adding to the dry wine base to achieve the desired residual sugar level in the final product. (Usually spelled "muté " in this case and pronounced "mju:te".)

Related terms

Verb

Mute (third-person singular simple present Mutes, present participle muting, simple past and past participle muted)

  1. (transitive) To silence, to make quiet.
  2. (transitive) To turn off the sound of.
    Please mute the music while I make a call.

Derived terms

Thesaurus

abiotic, acoustic tile, allophone, alveolar, anaudic, antiknock, aphasic, aphonic, apico-alveolar, apico-dental, articulation, aspiration, assimilation, azoic, baffle, baffler, baton, bearer, bilabial, bit player, breathless, brief, brusque, cacuminal, cerebral, check, close, close-tongued, closemouthed, concise, consonant, continuant, curt, cushion, damp, dampen, dampener, damper, deaden, deaf-mute, deafen, dental, diapason, diphthong, dissimilation, dull, dumb, dumbfounded, dumbstricken, dumbstruck, dummy, economical of words, epenthetic vowel, exanimate, explosive, extra, figurant, figurante, gag, glide, glottal, glottalization, griever, guttural, hush, hushcloth, inanimate, inanimated, inarticulate, indisposed to talk, inert, insensate, insensible, insentient, keener, labial, labialization, labiodental, labiovelar, laconic, lamenter, laryngeal, lateral, lifeless, lingual, liquid, manner of articulation, metronome, modification, monochord, monophthong, morphophoneme, mourner, muffle, muffler, mum, music stand, muzzle, nasal, nonconscious, nonliving, occlusive, palatal, pallbearer, parasitic vowel, peak, pharyngeal, pharyngealization, phone, phoneme, pitch pipe, plosive, professional mourner, prothetic vowel, quiet, quietener, reserved, retroflex, rhythmometer, segmental phoneme, semivowel, senseless, short, silence, silence cloth, silencer, silent, snug, soft pedal, soft-pedal, soften, sonant, sonometer, sonority, sordine, sordino, soulless, sound-absorbing material, soundproofing, soundproofing insulation, sourdine, sparing of words, spear-carrier, speech sound, speechless, stand-in, standby, stick, stifle, stop, stricken dumb, subdue, substitute, supe, super, supernumerary, support, supporting actor, supporting cast, suppress, surd, syllabic nucleus, syllabic peak, syllable, tacit, taciturn, terse, tight-lipped, tone down, tone measurer, tongue-tied, tongueless, transition sound, triphthong, tuning bar, tuning fork, tuning pipe, turn down, unanimated, unconscious, understudy, unfeeling, unloquacious, unsaid, unspoken, untalkative, velar, vocable, vocalic, vocoid, voice, voiced sound, voiceless, voiceless sound, voicing, vowel, walk-on, walking gentleman, word-bound, wordless

Etymology

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mutus

Pronunciation

Translations

Adjective

Noun

Verb

See also


French

Verb

Mute

  1. first-person singular present indicative of muter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of muter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of muter
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of muter
  5. second-person singular imperative of muter

Anagrams


Italian

Adjective

Mute (pl)

  1. feminine form of muto

Noun

mute f.

  1. Plural form of muta.

Latin

Adjective

mūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of mūtus



Latvian

Noun

Mute

  1. mouth
Fifth declension noun
singular plural
nominative mute mutes
genitive mutes mušu
dative mutei mutēm
accusative muti mutes
locative mutē mutēs



Spanish

Verb

Mute (infinitive mutar)

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of mutar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of mutar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of mutar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of mutar.