Lug

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English

Noun

Lug (plural Lugs)
  1. A lug nut.
  2. (electricity) A device for terminating an electrical conductor to facilitate the mechanical connection; to the conductor it may be crimped to form a cold weld, soldered or have pressure from a screw.
  3. A part of something which sticks out, used as a handle or support.
  4. A fool, a large man.
  5. (UK) An ear or ear lobe.
  6. A wood box used for transporting fruit or vegetables.
  7. (slang) A request for money, as for political purposes.
    They put the lug on him at the courthouse.

Derived terms

Verb

Lug (third-person singular simple present lugs, present participle lugging, simple past and past participle lugged)

  1. (transitive) To haul, carry (especially something heavy).
    Why do you always lug around so many books?
  2. (transitive) To run at too slow a speed.
    When driving up a hill, choose a lower gear so you don't lug the engine.
  3. (transitive, nautical) To carry an excessive amount of sail for the conditions prevailing.

Derived terms

Thesaurus

Eustachian tube, anvil, auditory apparatus, auditory canal, auditory meatus, auditory nerve, auditory ossicles, auditory tube, auricle, basilar membrane, bear, bony labyrinth, buck, carry, cauliflower ear, cochlea, conch, concha, conduct, convey, draft, drag, draggle, draw, drumhead, ear, ear lobe, eardrum, endolymph, external ear, ferry, fly, freight, gawk, hale, hammer, haul, heave, hump, incus, inner ear, klutz, lift, lobe, lobster, lobule, looby, lout, lubber, lummox, lump, lurch, malleus, manhandle, mastoid process, middle ear, oaf, organ of Corti, outer ear, oval window, pack, palooka, perilymph, pinna, pull, round window, secondary eardrum, semicircular canals, shell, snake, snap, stapes, stirrup, strain, take, take in tow, tote, tow, trail, train, transport, trawl, troll, tug, twitch, tympanic cavity, tympanic membrane, tympanum, vellicate, vestibule, waft, whisk, wing, yank

Etymology

Probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge). Noun is via Scots lugge, probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish and Norwegian lugg). Probably related to slug (lazy, slow-moving), which is from similar Scandinavian sources.

Pronunciation

Translations

Noun

References

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Afrikaans

Noun

Lug

  1. air

Etymology

From Dutch lucht.


Serbo-Croatian

Noun

lȗg m. (Cyrillic spelling лу̑г)

  1. lye

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

Declension


Slovene

Noun

Lug m.

  1. lye

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.