Fang

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Contents

English

Verb

Fang (third-person singular simple present Fangs, present participle Fanging, simple past and past participle Fanged)

  1. (transitive, dialectal or archaic) To catch, capture; seize; grip; clutch; lay hold of.
  2. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To take; receive with assent; accept.
  3. (transitive, obsolete, as a guest) To receive with hospitality; welcome.
  4. (transitive, obsolete, a thing given or imposed) To receive.
  5. (transitive, dialectal) To receive or adopt into spiritual relation, as in baptism; be godfather or godmother to.

Related terms

Noun

Fang (plural Fangs)
  1. A long, pointed canine tooth used for biting and tearing flesh or (in snakes) for injecting venom.

Verb

Fang (third-person singular simple present Fangs, present participle Fanging, simple past and past participle Fanged)

  1. (rare) to strike or attack with the fangs

Thesaurus

baby tooth, beesting, bicuspid, bucktooth, canine, claws, clutches, cog, comb, crag, crown, cuspid, cutter, dart, deciduous tooth, dent, denticle, denticulation, dentil, dentition, digits, dogtooth, eyetooth, fangs, fingernails, fingers, fore tooth, gagtooth, gang tooth, gold tooth, grinder, hands, harrow, hooks, incisor, jag, jaws, mandibles, maxillae, meathooks, milk tooth, mitts, molar, nails, nippers, palm, peak, pecten, peg, permanent tooth, pincers, pivot tooth, pounces, premolar, projection, rake, ratchet, sawtooth, scrivello, snag, snaggle, snaggletooth, snakebite, spire, sprocket, spur, steeple, sting, stinger, talons, tang, teeth, tooth, tush, tusk, unguals, ungulae, wisdom tooth

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /fæŋ/
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English fangen, from Old English fōn (to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter), and Old Norse fanga (to fetch, capture), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhanan, *fangōnan (to catch, capture), from Proto-Indo-European *paḱ- (to fasten, place). Cognate with West Frisian fange (to catch), Dutch vangen (to catch), German fangen (to catch), Danish fange (to catch).

Etymology 2

Middle English, from Old English fang 'prey, booty, catch', from Proto-Germanic *fangan, *fangan (seizure, catching) (compare German Fang 'booty, capture'), from *fanhanan (to catch, capture) (compare Old English fōn, Old Saxon/Old High German fāhan), from Proto-Indo-European *peHg̑ 'to fasten' (compare Latin pangere 'to solidify, drive in', Albanian mpij 'to benumb, stiffen', Ancient Greek pḗgnymi 'to stiffen, firm up', Sanskrit pāśáyati '(s)he binds').

Translations

Noun


Catalan

Noun

Fang m. (plural Fangs)

  1. mud

See also


Danish

Verb

Fang

  1. imperative of fange
  1. Catch.
  2. Capture.
Fang mig!
Catch me!

German

Verb

Fang

  1. Imperative singular of fangen.

Mandarin

Pinyin syllable

fang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fáng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàng.

Notes

English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.


Scottish Gaelic

Noun

  1. vulture
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