Bide

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English

Verb

Bide (third-person singular simple present bides, present participle biding, simple past bode or bided, past participle bided or bidden)

  1. (transitive) (chiefly dialectal) To bear; to endure; to tolerate.
  2. (intransitive) (archaic or dialectal) To dwell or reside in a location; to abide.
  3. (intransitive) (archaic or dialectal) To wait; to be in expectation; to stay; to remain.
  4. (transitive) (archaic) To wait for; to await.

Adverbs for Bide

patiently; habitually; naively; perpetually; ephemerally; transiently; independently; pensively.

Thesaurus

abide, abide with, await, bear, bear with, bide the issue, brave, brook, carry on, cease not, continue, continue to be, dally, dawdle, defeat time, defy time, delay, dig, dillydally, drag on, dwell, endure, exist, extend, go along, go on, hang about, hang around, hang in, hang in there, hang out, hang tough, hold, hold everything, hold on, hold out, hold steady, hold your horses, jog on, keep, keep going, keep on, last, last long, last out, linger, live, live on, live through, loiter, lump, lump it, maintain, mark time, never cease, perdure, perennate, persevere, persist, prevail, put up with, remain, run, run on, sit tight, sit up, sit up for, slog on, stagger on, stand, stand for, stay, stay on, stay up, stay up for, stick, stick around, subsist, suffer, support, survive, sustain, sweat, sweat it out, sweat out, take time, take up with, tarry, tide over, tolerate, wait, wait a minute, wait and see, wait for, wait on, wait up for, watch, watch and wait, wear, wear well

Etymology

From Old English bīdan, from Proto-Germanic

Notes

  • The verb has been replaced by abide in Standard English for almost all its uses, and is now rarely found outside the expression bide one's time.

Pronunciation

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms


Basque

Etymology 1

Noun

Bide

  1. path, track, way
  2. way, manner, method, procedure
  3. journey
  4. line

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Adverb

Bide

  1. apparently

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītanan, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeid- (to split).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /biːdə/, [ˈb̥iːðə]

Verb

Bide (imperative bid, infinitive at bide, present tense bider, past tense bed, past participle har bidt)

  1. bite (to cut off a piece by clamping the teeth)

French

Noun

Bide m. (plural Bides)

  1. A fiasco or flop, particularly in the entertainment industry; a box office bomb.
  2. (informal) The belly, especially a fat one; the stomach or abdomen.
  3. (uncountable) Something fake.

Synonyms


Scots

Etymology

From Old English bīdan, from Proto-Germanic.

Verb

Bide

  1. to dwell, to live
    Tae bide somewhaur: to dwell somewhere.
    Tae bide: to dwell.
    Whaur dae ye bide?: where do you live?

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

Bide (Cyrillic spelling биде)

  1. bidet